<?xml version="1.0"?>
<!DOCTYPE poppi-xml SYSTEM "poppi-xml.dtd">
<poppi-xml>
<key>
  <kp id="1">
    <kc type="k" dest="F1">Aquatic plant, with leaves almost all submerged or floating (though flowers may be raised above the water)</kc>
    <kc type="k" dest="2">Terrestrial plant, or, if aquatic, with many of the leaves raised above the surface</kc>
  </kp>
  <kp id="2">
    <kc type="k" dest="E1">Tree or shrub, or climber with woody stem</kc>
    <kc type="k" dest="3">Herbaceous plant, or low, creeping shrub less than 15 cm high</kc>
  </kp>
  <kp id="3">
    <kc type="k" dest="4">Sepals and petals both present and clearly differentiated from each other</kc>
    <kc type="k" dest="5">Perianth absent, or apparently consisting of either calyx or corolla, but not both</kc>
  </kp>
  <kp id="4">
    <kc type="k" dest="A1">Petals free, or very slightly united at the extreme base</kc>
    <kc type="k" dest="B1">Petals united</kc>
  </kp>
  <kp id="5">
    <kc type="k" dest="C1">Perianth corolla-like in colour and texture</kc>
    <kc type="k" dest="D1">Perianth calyx-like in colour and texture, or absent</kc>
  </kp>

  <kp id="A1">
    <kc type="k" dest="A2">Flowers regular</kc>
    <kc type="k" dest="A39">Flowers irregular</kc>
  </kp>
  <kp id="A2">
    <kc type="k" dest="A3">Stamens indefinite in number, usually more than 12</kc>
    <kc type="k" dest="A13">Stamens definite in number, usually 12 or fewer</kc>
  </kp>
  <kp id="A3">
    <kc type="g" dest="Sarraceniaceae>Sarracenia">Leaves in the form of a hollow cone, with a lid-like flap at the mouth</kc>
    <kc type="k" dest="A4">Leaves not in the form of hollow cone</kc>
  </kp>
  <kp id="A4">
    <kc type="f" dest="Papavaraceae">Latex present</kc>
    <kc type="k" dest="A5">Latex absent</kc>
  </kp>
</key>
<f>
  <name>Berberidaceae</name>
  <g>
    <name>Berberis</name>
    <s>
      <name>Berberis vulgaris</name>
      <desc>
        <di><dt>English Name</dt><dd>Barberry</dd></di>
        <di><dt>Time of Flowering</dt><dd>5-6</dd></di>
        <di><dt /><dd>A deciduous shrub, up to 2.5 m high; branches armed with slender, very sharp spines in groups of three. Leaves undivided, alternate, oblong to oval, finely toothed, 2-3 cm long. Flowers 3-7 mm across, yellow, regular and hermaphrodite, in drooping racemes. Perianth segments about 15, petal-like. Ovary superior, of a single carpel. Fruit a scarlet, oblong berry. Hedges and rocky ground; very rare. Formerly more frequen, but exterminated in most districts as the carrier of the rust-fungus of wheat.</dd></di>
        <di><dt /><dd>Various species and hybrids of this genus are cultivated for ornament, and bird-sown seedlings have been recorded. The only one, however, which can be regarded as naturalised is B. darwinii which is a shrab to 3 m with dark-green glossy, oblong leaves, spines less that 1cm, clusters of bright orange flowers and bluey-black fruit. It is established among native vegetation in a few places in the West and North.</dd></di>
      </desc>
    </s>
  </g>
</f>
<f>
  <name>Papavaraceae</name>
  <desc>
    <di><dt>English Name</dt><dd>Poppy</dd></di>
    <di><dt>Type</dt><dd>Erect herb</dd></di>
    <di><dt>Latex</dt><dd>White or yellow</dd></di>
    <di><dt>Leaves</dt><dd>Alternate, pinnately divided</dd></di>
    <di><dt>Flowers</dt><dd>Regular, hermaphrodite</dd></di>
    <di><dt>Sepals</dt><dd>2, falling as the flower opens</dd></di>
    <di><dt>Petals</dt><dd>4, crimpled in bud, free large and brightly coloured, soon falling</dd></di>
    <di><dt>Stamens</dt><dd>Numerous, free</dd></di>
    <di><dt>Ovary</dt><dd>Superior, of 2-12 fused carpels</dd></di>
    <di><dt>Fruit</dt><dd>Capsule with numerous seeds</dd></di>
    <di><dt /><dd>Many poppies are cultivated in gardens. Some can persist for short periods as garden throw-outs. These include a number of species and hybrids of Papaver (especially common is Papaver orientale, with large flowers (4+ cm) of various colours (pink-red); the perennial Blue poppy (a large blue-flowered and coarsely hairy Meconopsis from the Himalayas); and the sometimes perennial, yellow-flowered Californian poppy (Eschscholzia californica)).</dd></di>
  </desc>
  <key>
    <kp id="1">
      <kc type="g" dest="Papaver">Flowers red, purple or white</kc> 
      <kc type="k" dest="2">Flowers yellow</kc>
    </kp>
    <kp id="2">
      <kc type="g" dest="Meconopsis">Stigma with 4 or more lobes; fruit less than six times as long as wide</kc>
      <kc type="k" dest="3">Stigma with 2-lobes; fruit at least ten times as long as wide</kc>
    </kp>
    <kp id="3">
      <kc type="g" dest="Glaucium">Flowers more than 3cm across; fruit than 10cm long</kc>
      <kc type="g" dest="Chelidonium">Flowers less than 3cm across; fruit less than 6cm long</kc> 
    </kp>
  </key>
  <g>
    <name>Papaver</name>
    <desc>
      <di><dt>English Name</dt><dd>Poppy</dd></di>
      <di><dt>Irish Name</dt><dd>Poipin</dd></di>
      <di><dt>Growth Cycle</dt><dd>Annual</dd></di>
      <di><dt>Flowers</dt><dd>Large, solitary</dd></di>
      <di><dt>Latex</dt><dd>White</dd></di>
      <di><dt>Leaves</dt><dd>Pinnate or pinnatifid, the segments often with a single hair or sharp point at the tip</dd></di>
      <di><dt>Fruit</dt><dd>globular or club-shaped capsule, with a persistent stigmatic disc at the top, opening by pores below the disc.</dd></di>
    </desc>
    <key>
      <kp id="1">
        <kc type="s" dest="Papaver somniferum">Stem leaves distinctly pale bluish-green, toothed but not divided. Petals white or lilac. Sepals hairless.</kc>
        <kc type="k" dest="2">Stem leaves not pale bluish-green, pinnately divided. Petals bright red. Sepals hairy.</kc>
      </kp>
      <kp id="2">
        <kc type="k" dest="3">Ovary and capsule hairy; inner pair of petals smaller than outer.</kc>
        <kc type="k" dest="4">Ovary and capsule not hairy; all petals more or less the same size.</kc>
      </kp> 
      <kp id="3">
        <kc type="s" dest="Papaver rhoeas">Capsule more or less globular. Peduncle with spreading hairs (at least at the base).</kc>
        <kc type="s" dest="Papaver dubium">Capsule at least twice as long as broad. Peduncle with non-spreading hairs.</kc>
      </kp>
      <kp id="4" >
        <kc type="s" dest="Papaver argemone">Capsule less than 1.5 cm, nearly as long as broad.</kc>
        <kc type="s" dest="Papaver hybridum">Capsule more than 1.5 cm, at least 3 times as long as broad.</kc>
      </kp> 
    </key>
    <s>
      <name>Papaver somniferum</name>
      <desc>
        <di><dt>English Name</dt><dd>Opium poppy</dd></di>
        <di><dt>Irish Name</dt><dd>Codlaidin</dd></di>
        <di><dt>Time Of Flowering</dt><dd>7-8</dd></di>
        <di><dt>Height</dt><dd>50+ cm</dd></di>
        <di><dt>Leaves</dt><dd>Oblong, pale bluish-green, toothed but not divided, the upper ones stalkless and clasping the stem</dd></di>
        <di><dt>Flowers</dt><dd>5-10 cm across; petals mauve or white with a purple centre.</dd></di>
        <di><dt>Fruit</dt><dd>Capsule hairless, globular c. 2-5(-9) cm long.</dd></di>
        <di><dt>Habitat</dt><dd>Sandy soils by roadsides and in waste places</dd></di>
        <di><dt>Distribution</dt><dd>Occasional, commonest on the central part of the East coast. Native of Turkey.</dd></di>
      </desc>
    </s>  
    <s>
      <name>Papaver rhoeas</name>
      <desc>
        <di><dt>English Name</dt><dd>Corn poppy</dd></di>
        <di><dt>Irish Name</dt><dd>Caithleach dearg</dd></di>
        <di><dt>Time Of Flowering</dt><dd>6-8</dd></di>
        <di><dt>Height</dt><dd>60 cm</dd></di>
        <di><dt>Distinguishing Features</dt><dd>Coarse, spreading hairs on the pedicels</dd></di>
        <di><dt>Latex</dt><dd>Occasionally yellow</dd></di>
        <di><dt>Leaves</dt><dd>Stalkless and pinnatafid with the lobes coarsely toothed.</dd></di>
        <di><dt>Flowers</dt><dd>5-10 cm across, petals bright red; outer pair larger than inner.</dd></di>
        <di><dt>Fruit</dt><dd>Capsule hairless, more or less globular c. 2 cm long, often with whitish bloom.</dd></di>
        <di><dt>Habitat</dt><dd>Arable land, roadsides, gravel pits and waste places</dd></di>
        <di><dt>Distribution</dt><dd>Frequent in the East, occasional in the Centre, rare in the West and very rare in the North.</dd></di>
      </desc>
    </s>
    <s>
      <name>Papaver dubium</name>
      <desc>
        <di><dt>Time Of Flowering</dt><dd>6-8</dd></di>
        <di><dt /><dd>
        Similar to P. rhoeas but the hairs on the pedicels not spreading, the flowers only 3-6 cm across, the petals pale red to pink, and the capsule narrowly club-shaped (two to three times as long as broad). Similar habitats to P. rhoeas; frequent in the East and Centre, local and rare elsewhere.
        PLants wth white atex and yellow anthers or with yellow latex and brownish to bluish anthers appear to be about equally frequent. The latter are usually distinguished as subsp. lecoquii, but other supposedly distinguishing characteristics appear to be unreliable.
        </dd></di>
      </desc>
    </s>
    <s>
      <name>Papaver argemone</name>
      <desc>
        <di><dt>Time Of Flowering</dt><dd>5-7</dd></di>
        <di><dt /><dd>
        A slender plant, seldom more than 40 cm tall. Lower leaves stalked and pinnate with pinnatifid segments. Flowers 3-5 cm across. Petals relatively pale, orange-red with an indigo centre, more or less equal in size. Capsule narrowly ovoid to club-shaped (about three to four times as long as broad) with a scattered covering of bristly hairs, c. 2.5 cm long. Sandy and gravelly ground; mainly in the South and East; rare and decreasing.
        </dd></di>
      </desc>
    </s>
    <s>
      <name>Papaver hybridum</name>
      <desc>
        <di><dt>Time Of Flowering</dt><dd>6-7</dd></di>
        <di><dt /><dd>
        Erect, up to 45 cm tall. Leaves pinnate with deeply toothed or pinnatifid segments. Flowers 3-5 cm across. Petals crimson, more or less equal in size. Capsule ovoid with a dense covering of bristly hairs, c. 1-1.5 cm long. Sandy fields; formerly occasional, now very rare in the East (Dublin).
        </dd></di>
      </desc>
    </s>
  </g>
  <g>
    <name>Meconopsis</name>
    <s>
      <name>Meconopsis cambrica</name>
      <desc>
        <di><dt>English Name</dt><dd>Welsh poppy</dd></di>
        <di><dt>Time Of Flowering</dt><dd>6-7</dd></di>
        <di><dt>Height</dt><dd>20-40 cm</dd></di>
        <di><dt>Latex</dt><dd>Yellow</dd></di>
        <di><dt>Leaves</dt><dd>Pinnate with the segments coarselt toothed; distinctly stalked.</dd></di>
        <di><dt>Flowers</dt><dd>4-7 cm across, petals bright yellow. Stigma 4-6 lobed, raised on a very short but distinct style.</dd></di>
        <di><dt>Fruit</dt><dd>Capsule narrowly club-shaped (about 3-4 times as long as broad), hairless, c. 2-3 cm long.</dd></di>
        <di><dt>Habitat</dt><dd>Damp, shady, rocky places, mainly in the mountains; rare. Also occasionally near houses as an escape from gardens.</dd></di>
        <di><dt /><dd>A slightly hairy perrenal with a strong tap-root.</dd></di>
      </desc>
    </s>
  </g>
  <g>
    <name>Glaucium</name>
    <s>
      <name>Glaucium flavum</name>
      <desc>
        <di><dt>English Name</dt><dd>Horned poppy</dd></di>
        <di><dt>Time Of Flowering</dt><dd>6-8</dd></di>
        <di><dt>Latex</dt><dd>Yellow</dd></di>
        <di><dt>Leaves</dt><dd>Irregularly pinnatafid, thick; the basal ones stalked and hairy; the upper ones stalkless, sometimes hairless; the uppermost clasping the stem.</dd></di>
        <di><dt>Flowers</dt><dd>5-8 cm across. Petals orange-yellow.</dd></di>
        <di><dt>Fruit</dt><dd>Capsule thin, up to 30 cm long, usually much more than fifteen times as long as broad, splitting along its length from the top.</dd></di>
        <di><dt>Habitat</dt><dd>Sand- or shingle-beaches</dd></di>
        <di><dt>Distribution</dt><dd>Absent from the North-west, (Antrim to Mayo), locally frequent elsewhere.</dd></di>
      </desc>
    </s>
  </g>
  <g>
    <name>Chelidonium</name>
    <s>
      <name>Chelidonium majus</name>
      <desc>
        <di><dt>Time Of Flowering</dt><dd>5-7</dd></di>
        <di><dt>Latex</dt><dd>bright, orange-yellow</dd></di>
        <di><dt>Leaves</dt><dd>Pinnate, with large, irregularly lobed segments.</dd></di>
        <di><dt>Flowers</dt><dd>1.5-2 cm across, in loose clusters of 3-5. Petals yellow.</dd></di>
        <di><dt>Fruit</dt><dd>Capsule long and thing, usually more than ten times as long as broad, splitting from the bottom towards the top, 2-5 cm long.</dd></di>
        <di><dt>Habitat</dt><dd>Walls and hedges, usually near houses</dd></di>
        <di><dt>Distribution</dt><dd>locally frequent in the East half, rare in the West and South</dd></di>
      </desc>
    </s>
  </g>
</f>  
<f>
  <name>Sarraceniaceae</name>
  <g>
    <name>Sarracenia</name>
    <s>
      <name>Sarracenia purpurea</name>
      <desc>
        <di><dt>English Name</dt><dd>Pitcher-plant</dd></di>
        <di><dt>Time Of Flowering</dt><dd>5-7</dd></di>
        <di><dt /><dd>A rather fleshy, hairless perennial. Leaves all basal, in the form of hollow, inverted cones with lid-like flaps at their mouth; often purplish-red. In the liquid inside the cone insects are trapped and digested. Flowers solitary, 5-7 cm across, on stout stems 25-45 cm high. Sepals and petals 5, free; petals smaller than the sepals; sepals dark purplish-red on the inside, and petals on both sides. Stamens numerous. Ovary superior; style single, expanded at the tip into a large yellow-green disc, which fills the centre of the flower. Fruit a capsule. Planted in a few bogs in the Centre and West, and well naturalised. Native of Canada and the U.S.A.</dd>
        </di>
      </desc>
    </s>
  </g>
</f>  
<f>
  <name>Fumariaceae</name>
  <desc>
    <di><dt></dt><dd>Delicate, hairless annual herbs with alternate leaves which are pinnately divided into small segments. Flowers irregular, hermaphrodite, in racemes whise base is opposite that of a leaf. Sepals 2, small, often falling early. Petals 4, of which two are larger, partly united, and prolonged into a backward pointing spur at the base<img src="images/poppy-no-image.png" alt ="" />. Stamens 6, but united into 2 bundles wach with three lobes, the central part bearing a 2-celled anther and the lateral lobes a single-celled anther (some authorities offer another interpretation; that there are two stamens which have split into three lobes). Overy superior, fused, of 2 carpels. Fruit a nut.</dd></di>
    <di><dt></dt><dd>Some authors prefer to treat the Fumariaceae as a subfamily of the Papavaraceae.</dd></di>
    <di><dt></dt><dd>Dicentra (Bleeding-heart) is commonly grown in gardens.</dd></di>
  </desc> 
  <key>
    <kp id="1">
      <kc type="g" dest="Pseudofumaria">Flowers bright yellow; fruit a pod-like capsule.</kc>
      <kc type="k" dest="2">Flowers purple, pinkish-white or yellowish-white.</kc>
    </kp>
    <kp id="2">
      <kc type="g" dest="Fumaria">Fruit an ovoid, one-seeded, but-like achene.</kc>
      <kc type="g" dest="Ceratocapnos">Fruit a dehiscent capsule with more than one seed.</kc>
    </kp>
  </key>
  <g>
    <name>Ceratocapnos</name>
    <s>
      <name>Ceratocapnos claviculata</name>
      <desc>
        <di><dt>Time of Flowering</dt><dd>4-10</dd></di>
        <di><dt></dt><dd>A delicate, diffusely branched, scrambling herb up to 80 cm, with some of the terminal leaf segments converted into tendrils. Leaflets long-stalked, oval, obtuse with a minute apical point. Flowers 5-6 mm long, in dense racemes of approximately 6 flowers. Petals pale yellow or cream. Fruit a short, pod-like capsule with 2-3 seeds.</dd></di>
        <di><dt>Habitat</dt><dd>Shady places, among boulders</dd></di>
        <di><dt>Distribution</dt><dd>Occasional, but local, in the South-east and South Centre, and once recorded in Donegal.</dd></di>
      </desc>
    </s>
  </g>
  <g>
    <name>Pseudofumaria</name>
    <s>
      <name>Pseudofumaria lutea</name>
      <desc>
        <di><dt>Time of Flowering</dt><dd>5-8</dd></di>
        <di><dt></dt><dd>A small, bushy, hairless perennial. Some leaves arising from a central stock. Leaflets wedge-shaped, lobed, with a minute apical point. Flowers 12-18 mm long; in dense, short, often one-sided racemes of 6-10 flowers. Petals yellow. Fruit a capsule c. 1 cm long with the wall constricted around the 5 or more shiny seeds.</dd></di>
        <di><dt>Habitiat</dt><dd>Grown in gardens; sometimes naturalised on old walls nearby.</dd></di>
        <di><dt>Distribution</dt><dd>Native of Europe.</dd></di>
      </desc>
    </s>  
  </g>
  <g>
    <name>Fumaria</name>
    <desc>
      <di><dt>English Name</dt><dd>Fumitory</dd></di>
      <di><dt></dt><dd>Leaves all cauline. Flowers purplish pink to white. Upper and lateral petals dark coloured at the tip. The edges of the lower petal may be wither more or less parallel along their entire length or spoon-shaped at the tip. Fruit a small, more or less spherical, one-seeded nut.</dd></di>
      <di><dt></dt><dd>The differences between some species appear clearer and more consistent in Britain than Ireland.</dd></di>
    </desc>
    <key>
      <kp id="1">
        <kc type="k" dest="2">Flowers more than or equal to 9 mm in length; lower petal not strongly spoon-shaped<img src="images/fumkey1.png" alt ="" />.</kc>
        <kc type="k" dest="5">Flowers less than 9 mm in length; lower petal distinctly spoon-shaped<img src="images/fumkey2.png" alt ="" />.</kc>
      </kp>
      <kp id="2">
        <kc type="k" dest="3">Fruiting pedicels curved stiffly downwards or horizontal; sepals often with a blunt tip.</kc>
        <kc type="k" dest="4">Fruiting pedicels more or less erect; sepals often with an acute tip.</kc>
      </kp>
      <kp id="3">
        <kc type="s" dest="Fumaria capreolata">Flowers creamy-white; racemes shorter than their peduncle; upper petal with spreading edges.</kc>
        <kc type="s" dest="Fumaria purpurea">Flowers purple; racmes as long as their peduncle; upper petal with erect or curved-back edges.</kc>
      </kp>
      <kp id="4">
        <kc type="s" dest="Fumaria muralis">Lower petal with parallel edges.</kc>
        <kc type="k" dest="7">Lower petal slightly spoon-shaped.</kc>
      </kp>
      <kp id="5">
        <kc type="s" dest="Fumaria denisflora">Bracts at least as long as pedicels.</kc>
        <kc type="k" dest="6">Bracts shorter than pedicels.</kc>
      </kp>
      <kp id="6">
        <kc type="s" dest="Fumaria officinalis">Fruits wider than long.</kc>
        <kc type="k" dest="7">Fruits longer than wide.</kc>
      </kp>
      <kp id="7">
        <kc type="s" dest="Fumaria muralis">Fruit not distinctly rough when dry; racemes about as long as peduncles, with 15 or fewer flowers.</kc>
        <kc type="s" dest="Fumaria bastardii">Fruit distinctly rough when dry; racemes longer than peduncles, with more than 15 flowers.</kc>
      </kp>
    </key>
    <s>
      <name>Fumaria capreolata</name>
      <desc>
        <di><dt>Time of Flowering</dt><dd>5-9</dd></di>
        <di><dt></dt><dd>Scrambling by means of twisted petioles.  Leaf-segments oblong or triangular, up to 15 mm long. Racemes dense, shorter than their peduncles. Sepals 4-6 mm long, as broad as corolla <img src="images/f.capreolata.png" alt ="" />. Corolla 10-14 mm long, white or pale pink, tipped with darker purple; tip of upper petal with spreading margins. Fruit usually smooth when dry.
        </dd></di>
        <di><dt>Habitat</dt><dd>Roadsides, arable and waste ground</dd></di>
        <di><dt>Distribution</dt><dd>Mainly coastal</dd></di>
        <di><dt>Sub-species</dt><dd>F. occidentalis of rubust, climbing habit, with a large flower 10-13 mm long; with the white petals turning bright pink later, with their edges and tips blackish-red and with the lower petal with broad spreading margins, is a rare casual. (Dublin)</dd></di>
      </desc>
    </s>
    <s>
      <name>Fumaria purpurea</name>
      <desc>
        <di><dt>Time of Flowering</dt><dd>6-8</dd></di>
        <di><dt></dt><dd>Similar to F. carpeolata differing in sepals which are rather more acutely pointed <img src="images/f.purpurea.png" alt ="" />, and in the dark pinkish corolla the upper petal of which has a tip with erect margins.</dd></di>
        <di><dt>Habitat</dt><dd>Roadsides, arable and waste ground</dd></di>
        <di><dt>Distribution</dt><dd>Rare</dd></di>
      </desc>
    </s>  
    <s>
      <name>Fumaria muralis</name>
      <desc>
        <di><dt>Time of Flowering</dt><dd>5-9</dd></di>
        <di><dt></dt><dd>Stem erect or diffuse, not climbing. Leaf segments variously shaped. Racemes lax, as long as their peduncles or rather longer. Sepals 3-5 mm long, narrower than corolla <img src="images/f.muralis.png" alt ="" />.  Corolla white or pink, 9-12 mm long; lower petal usually with parallel margins. Fruit usually smooth when dry.  </dd></di>
        <di><dt>Habitat</dt><dd>Waste ground, field margins and arable land</dd></di>
        <di><dt>Distribution</dt><dd>Very frequent</dd></di>
        <di><dt></dt><dd>Sometimes difficult, if not impossible, to separate from the next species. Irish material is very variable and needs further investigation; sub-specific descriptions of F. muralis based on British material do not comfortably fit Irish specimens.</dd></di>
      </desc>
    </s>  
    <s>
      <name>Fumaria bastardii</name>
      <desc>
        <di><dt>Time of Flowering</dt><dd>5-9</dd></di>
        <di><dt></dt><dd>Similar to F. muralis but with rather larger racemes of more than 15 flowers, sepals 2-3 mm long <img src="images/f.bastardii.png"  alt ="" /> and the fruit usually distinctly rough when dry.  </dd></di>
        <di><dt>Habitat</dt><dd>Waste ground, field margins and arable land.</dd></di>
      </desc>
    </s>  
    <s>
      <name>Fumaria officinalis</name>
      <desc>
        <di><dt>Time of Flowering</dt><dd>6-9</dd></di>
        <di><dt></dt><dd>Stem more or less erect, not climbing.  Leaf segments narrow-oblong or lanceolate, flat. Racemes much than their peduncles. Sepals 2-4 mm long, much narrower than corolla <img src="images/f.officinalis.png" alt ="" />. Corolla 7-9 mm long, pinkish-purple tipped with dark red; lower petal spoon-shaped. Fruit distinctly rough when dry.  </dd></di>
        <di><dt>Habitat</dt><dd>Field margins and waste places</dd></di>
        <di><dt>Distribution</dt><dd>Frequent near the east coast, rarer elsewhere.</dd></di>
      </desc>
    </s>  
    <s>
      <name>Fumaria denisflora</name>
      <desc>
        <di><dt></dt><dd>Similar to F. officinalis but with narrower chanelled leaflets, even shorter peduncles, smaller, very densely packed flowers and sepals as broad as the corolla.  <img src="images/f.denisflora.png" alt ="" />.  </dd></di>
        <di><dt>Habitat</dt><dd>Field margins</dd></di>
        <di><dt>Distribution</dt><dd>the North half; rare.</dd></di>
      </desc>
    </s>
  </g>  
</f>  
</poppi-xml>